National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

NOAA MSL12 Ocean Color, near real-time, VIIRS multi-sensor (SNPP + NOAA-20), chlorophyll DINEOF gap-filled analysis

V2020006_A1_WW00_chlora_120.png VIIRS Ocean Color multi-sensor gap-filled analysis (Level 4) is produced with input from the VIIRS multi-sensor (SNPP + NOAA-20) daily merged chlorophyll and monthly climatology using the DINEOF method of interpolation for gap-filling.  The chlorophyll algoritm used is OCI.  The NOAA ocean color science team provides the gap-filled data file to NOAA CoastWatch.  CoastWatch converts these to the NetCDF product and serves them.

NOAA MSL12 Ocean Color, science quality, VIIRS multi-sensor (SNPP + NOAA-20), chlorophyll DINEOF gap-filled analysis

V2020006_A1_WW00_chlora_120.png VIIRS Ocean Color multi-sensor gap-filled analysis (Level 4) is produced with input from the VIIRS multi-sensor (SNPP + NOAA-20) daily merged chlorophyll and monthly climatology using the DINEOF method of interpolation for gap-filling.  The chlorophyll algoritm used is OCI.  The NOAA ocean color science team provides the gap-filled data file to NOAA CoastWatch.  CoastWatch converts these to the NetCDF product and serves them.

NOAA MSL12 Ocean Color, near real time, VIIRS multi-sensor SNPP + NOAA-20 daily merge

V2020015_D1_NPP-N20_WW00_chloci_800_0.png VIIRS Ocean Color multi-sensor (SNPP + NOAA-20) daily merge (Level 3 composite) is produced from the NOAA Multi-Sensor Level 1 to Level 2 processing system (MSL12) near real time processing stream by the NOAA ocean color science team.  NOAA CoastWatch converts files to NetCDF and serves them here.

Synthetic Aperture Radar (Surface Roughness) Winds

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Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery maps the surface microwave radar reflectivity at resolutions from a sub-meter to 100 m depending on the particular SAR satellite and mode. Since a radar provides its own illumination, imagery is independent of the time of day. At typical radar frequencies, SARs can image through clouds, so SARs are considered "all-weather" instruments.  Several gephysical parameters can be derived from SAR including sea surface wind speed.

Oceanic Heat Content, Mixed Layer Depth and Depths of 20°C and 26°C Isotherms

ohc_naQG3_2020_130_0.png Oceanic Heat Content (OHC) is the measure of the integrated vertical temperature from the sea surface to the depth of the 26°C isotherm and computed from the altimeter-derived isotherm depths in the upper ocean relative to 20°C.  Global 0.25 degree grids are generated daily for OHC, mixed layer depth and depths of 20°C and 26°C isotherms for 3 ocean basins:  North Atlantic, North Pacific and South Pacific 

ACSPO Global SST from ABI

20181013020037_FD_120.png The ABI SST data are produced from GOES-16 and GOES-17 satellite using the NOAA Advanced Clear-Sky Processor for Ocean (ACSPO) v2.7x enterprise system. Currently, near-real time (NRT) data are produced at STAR, with a ~2-6 hour latency. A Reanalysis (RAN) dataset for GOES-16 is also available. The data are available in NetCDF4 format, compliant with the GHRSST Data Specifications v2 (GDS2). Currently, the data are archived on PO.DAAC and available at this Coast Watch page as a 2week rotated buffer.

 

ACSPO Global SST from AVHRR FRAC

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  • NOAA Advanced Clear-Sky Processor for Ocean (ACSPO) v2.70 enterprise system
  • AVHRR FRAC SST from Metop-A and -B satellites
  • Near-real time (NRT) L2P and corresponding 0.02° L3U (gridded uncollated), operationally produced by OSPO, ~3hrs latency,
  • AVHRR FRAC SST from Metop-C produced at STAR, ~6hrs latency, 2 weeks rotated buffer.